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WHY SINDOOR IN YOUR BINDI MAY BE BAD FOR BABIES – Dr. Sukhmeet

WHY SINDOOR IN YOUR BINDI MAY BE BAD FOR BABIES – Dr. Sukhmeet

Jangatha/ New York:  Sindoor, a red powder used during Hindu religious and cultural ceremonies, has unsafe levels of lead, a highly toxic poison associated with lower IQ, behavioural problems and growth delays in children, says a study that examined samples of the cosmetic powder collected from India and the US.

Sindoor, also called vermillion, is used by women to place a bindi, or red dot, cosmetically on their foreheads. Married women also put it in their hair and it is used by men and children for religious purposes.
In a study published in the American Journal of Public Health, the researchers reported that that 83 per cent of the samples collected from the US in New Jersey and 78 per cent collected from India had at least 1.0 microgram of lead per gram of cosmetic powder.

About one-third of the samples exceeded the 20 microgram of lead per gram of cosmetic powder limit imposed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Lead is a highly toxic poison associated with lower IQ, behavioral problems and growth delays in children who often are exposed hand to mouth.

“There is no safe level of lead,” said co-author of the study Derek Shendell, Associate Professor at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

“That’s why we believe sindoor powder shouldn’t be sold or brought into the United States unless it is lead free,”

Long-term exposure to lead, a naturally occurring metal used in everything from construction materials to batteries, can cause serious healthproblems, particularly in young kids

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